madlori:

I have decided that I will reblog this every time it comes across my dash because it makes me laugh until I think I’m going to puke.

madlori:

I have decided that I will reblog this every time it comes across my dash because it makes me laugh until I think I’m going to puke.

(Source: spoclcers-archive)

—We’ll need someone with state of the art computing skills.

—What?

—My regular contact in London has forsworn the practice. Something about not wanting to go to jail. So we have to contact them.

(Source: solthree)

girlyteenagenerd:

gleek4snix:

dicksp8jr:

agibaxe:

leonardnimoysdimples:

When an American hears the degrees in Celsius

image

When everyone else hears the degrees in Fahrenheit

image

 

oh my god

The accuracy of this post astounds me.

I laughed at this for over 15 minutes

(Source: robertpicardos)

modestdemidov:

robinistall:

fish shaming [x]

jesus christ i’ve been waiting for this

sarahseeandersen:

I’ll probably just wear T-shirts forever.

sarahseeandersen:

I’ll probably just wear T-shirts forever.

Background Actors Who Have No Idea What They Are Doing

ungratefullittleshit:

The guy who has no idea how brooms work:image

This guy that is pretty sure he was just kicked:image

This guy who has no control over his arm movements:

image

(Source: BuzzFeed)

medievalpoc:

Medievalpoc Presents: History of POC in Math and Science Week, 8-3-14 through 8-9-14!

Medievalpoc’s first Patreon Milestone Goal has been reached, and the History of POC in Math and Science Week is happening soon! This all-new themed week will focus on the contribution of people of color to the fields of mathematics, science, physics, medicine, natural philosophy, and much, much more!

There will be a focus on primary documents with interactive elements, visual and documentary evidence, innovators and their biographies, and notable personages of color from the Islamic Golden Age, Medieval Europe, African Empires and Universities, Asian images and texts, and discussion about early modern globalization regarding how this knowledge traveled.

If you have an article, image, document, or commentary you would like to submit, here’s your chance to weigh in on this topic! Please use the “Math and Science Week” and any other relevant tags for your submission, and I look forward to hearing about your favorite mathematicians and scientists of color!

griseus:

There is a wide range of lifespans for the various creatures that inhabit the oceans.
infographic produced by Smarter Every Day

griseus:

There is a wide range of lifespans for the various creatures that inhabit the oceans.

artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

mallelis:

babe babe babe
babe
babe are you awake
babe wake up

what
what is it
babe what if we stayed in bed all day
we’re in bed right now
no but we’ll just
it’ll be like now but in the day

why would we do that
for peace, yoko
ok
and we could order room service for peace 
ok
and make pillow forts for peace
ok
did you just wake me up to tell me to stay in bed
stay in bed for peace, yoko
okay well i’m going to start now, okay?
okay
i’m going back to sleep
going back to sleep for peace?

John Lennon writes “Imagine”

skunkbear:

nprglobalhealth:

How Protecting Wildlife Helps Stop Child Labor And Slavery
When scientists talk about the destruction of rain forests or the acidification of oceans, we often hear about the tragic loss of plants and animals.
But ecologists at the University of California, Berkeley, say there’s also a human tragedy that frequently goes unnoticed: As fish and fauna are wiped out, more children around the world are forced to work. And more people are forced into indentured servitude, scientists wrote Thursday in the journal Science.
"My students, postdocs and I spent a year stepping back and trying to connect the dots between wildlife decline and human exploitation," says ecologist Justin Brashares, who led the study. “We found about 50 examples around the world.”
One those examples made international headlines in June when the Guardianpublished a report about slavery in the Thai shrimping industry.
"Large numbers of men bought and sold like animals and held against their will on fishing boats off Thailand are integral to the production of prawns," the British newspaper reported. These shrimp are “sold in leading supermarkets around the world, including the top four global retailers: Walmart, Carrefour, Costco and Tesco,” the report said.
The world’s food supply, both here in the U.S. and abroad, is increasingly connected to child labor and human trafficking, Brashares says. And the problems isn’t just in the fishing industry or large supply chains that stock megagrocery stores. Many of the world’s poorest people are turning to exploitative labor practices to earn a living and feed their families as traditional sources of food disappear.
Wild animals, both on land and in the sea, provide incomes for about 15 percent of the world’s population, Brashares and his team wrote. These animals are also the main source of protein for many of these people.
Continue reading.
Photo: A child grabs sleep after a long day of labor in a struggling West African fishery. (Courtesy of Jessica Pociask, WANT Expeditions)

An important story.

skunkbear:

nprglobalhealth:

How Protecting Wildlife Helps Stop Child Labor And Slavery

When scientists talk about the destruction of rain forests or the acidification of oceans, we often hear about the tragic loss of plants and animals.

But ecologists at the University of California, Berkeley, say there’s also a human tragedy that frequently goes unnoticed: As fish and fauna are wiped out, more children around the world are forced to work. And more people are forced into indentured servitude, scientists wrote Thursday in the journal Science.

"My students, postdocs and I spent a year stepping back and trying to connect the dots between wildlife decline and human exploitation," says ecologist Justin Brashares, who led the study. “We found about 50 examples around the world.”

One those examples made international headlines in June when the Guardianpublished a report about slavery in the Thai shrimping industry.

"Large numbers of men bought and sold like animals and held against their will on fishing boats off Thailand are integral to the production of prawns," the British newspaper reported. These shrimp are “sold in leading supermarkets around the world, including the top four global retailers: Walmart, Carrefour, Costco and Tesco,” the report said.

The world’s food supply, both here in the U.S. and abroad, is increasingly connected to child labor and human trafficking, Brashares says. And the problems isn’t just in the fishing industry or large supply chains that stock megagrocery stores. Many of the world’s poorest people are turning to exploitative labor practices to earn a living and feed their families as traditional sources of food disappear.

Wild animals, both on land and in the sea, provide incomes for about 15 percent of the world’s population, Brashares and his team wrote. These animals are also the main source of protein for many of these people.

Continue reading.

Photo: A child grabs sleep after a long day of labor in a struggling West African fishery. (Courtesy of Jessica Pociask, WANT Expeditions)

An important story.

“All right,” said Susan. “I’m not stupid. You’re saying humans need… fantasies to make life bearable.”

REALLY? AS IF IT WAS SOME KIND OF PINK PILL? NO. HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN. TO BE THE PLACE WHERE THE FALLING ANGEL MEETS THE RISING APE.

"Tooth fairies? Hogfathers? Little—"

YES. AS PRACTICE. YOU HAVE TO START OUT LEARNING TO BELIEVE THE LITTLE LIES.

"So we can believe the big ones?"

YES. JUSTICE. MERCY. DUTY. THAT SORT OF THING.

"They’re not the same at all!"

YOU THINK SO? THEN TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YET—Death waved a hand. AND YET YOU ACT AS IF THERE IS SOME IDEAL ORDER IN THE WORLD, AS IF THERE IS SOME…SOME RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED.

"Yes, but people have got to believe that, or what’s the point—"

MY POINT EXACTLY.”

(Source: buckysbarnes)

libutron:

Golden fireworm  (Golden Bristle Worm)
This is a marine polychaete of the species Chloeia flava commonly referred to as Golden fireworm, which can reach up to 10 cm long and occurs in the  Indo-Pacific. 
These polychaetes have a bad reputation because their bristles (setae) are painfully urticating, hence their common name of fireworm.
[Annelida - Polychaeta - Amphinomida - Amphinomidae]
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Ben Naden | Locality: Bali, Indonesia

libutron:

Golden fireworm  (Golden Bristle Worm)

This is a marine polychaete of the species Chloeia flava commonly referred to as Golden fireworm, which can reach up to 10 cm long and occurs in the  Indo-Pacific. 

These polychaetes have a bad reputation because their bristles (setae) are painfully urticating, hence their common name of fireworm.

[Annelida - Polychaeta - Amphinomida - Amphinomidae]

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Ben Naden | Locality: Bali, Indonesia